Bug Out Bags

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Streetstar
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Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

I was just reading a post the good doctor made in politics about Denver giving away free bug out bags

It made me wonder what some of you lever gunners who have such things have in yours

I took advantage of the Oakley veterans and first responders discount to get a “Kitchen Sink” backpack with the thoughts of outfitting it to keep in the truck but I only got so far as a generic first aid kit from America’s favorite big retailer, a small flannel blanket, a spare pair of shoes, And a little bit of ammo

Which means the big bag is 1/10 full

Being a gun guy as I assume we all are, I carry my carry piece and spare mags elsewhere. But having a truck with a hard bed cover, I’m also carrying things like hatchet, compact shovels ropes, straps and a modest selection of tools In the back of the truck at any given time


Not sure if the term bug out is applicable to me as I would greatly prefer to “bug in” But I’ve heard these things referred to as “get home “ bags And other things like that. I don’t for see myself going on a 30 mile forced march to get home and but I think the idea for me is something to just keep a lot of handy gear in one place
----- Doug
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by 1894cfan »

Aside from the TP and paper towels, the Denver BOB is totally useless! There's no water, no food, no proper first aid stuff! The pack itself is probably the most useful item which can be used to put the right kind of stuff in. :?
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Blaine »

I'm staying right where I am. . Semi-Rural, at least a months worth of food. More guns and ammo than I could ever use.
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jeepnik
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by jeepnik »

Yep I too have bug in stuff. I’m on the coast. I’d have to go a long way to be out of a metropolitan area. So, stay put until the initial insanity is over. Then if necessary load up my jeep or boat and go.

The thing to remember is this. Disasters are relatively short lived and they generally involve a relatively small geographical area. If it is the end of the world it really won’t matter as we’ll all be dead.

I find it amusing that folks think they can live through extinction level events by stocking up on stuff. The only way to do that is not be here. And, we don’t have that capability.
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marlinman93
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by marlinman93 »

Personally at my age I'm not going anywhere. We plan to stay here if things get bad and deal with it until the end.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Mark in MO »

Some interesting ideas. I too carry a bag in each of my vehicles but they’re more along the lines of a “Get Home” bag, to get back if I’m away when things go south. As several others have indicated, I’m not planning to go anywhere but shelter in place at home.
Each bag contains a first aid kit, poncho, blanket, leather gloves, several ways to make fire, spare ammo for my EDC, hand warmers plus warm gloves and a sock cap. Included in the vehicle but not in the bag per se are flashlights, a compact shovel, folding saw, a small tire inflator and basic tool kit. Usually I also leave an old hoodie or something in there as well.
I need to include some water but afraid I’ll forget it when cold weather arrives and it will freeze and burst. I do have a LifeStraw, one of those water filtering straws, in each vehicle as a last resort.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Pitchy »

Like they say if ya run you`ll only die tired, we will be staying put and stocked up.
The thing that bothers me is there is no support from neighbors around here so it will be only us and ya can`t stay awake 24 hours a day and if it gets real weird snipers when ya go to get wood.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by jeepnik »

The mention of get home bags has me mentioning that I had one in my my vehicles long before it became fashionable. Spending most of my work day some distance from home caused me to prepare fairly substantial bags (large duffle). I frequently spent days when I wasn't within a tankful of gas distance home.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

jeepnik wrote:
Sat Sep 17, 2022 12:35 pm
The mention of get home bags has me mentioning that I had one in my my vehicles long before it became fashionable. Spending most of my work day some distance from home caused me to prepare fairly substantial bags (large duffle). I frequently spent days when I wasn't within a tankful of gas distance home.



What did you keep in there generally.
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Streetstar
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

Forgive me for thinking “bug out bag” was a universal term. - call it a car bag. What do you guys’ keep in your car bags

I live in the type of place people want to run to already so I’m not going anywhere but I also am in an occupation when a natural disaster happens I’m often driving that direction and as Jeepnik alluded to, ofTen hundreds of miles from home
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Blaine »

jeepnik wrote:
Sat Sep 17, 2022 12:35 pm
The mention of get home bags has me mentioning that I had one in my my vehicles long before it became fashionable. Spending most of my work day some distance from home caused me to prepare fairly substantial bags (large duffle). I frequently spent days when I wasn't within a tankful of gas distance home.
Another good reason why I rarely let the tank on my truck get below 1/2. :idea: You never know when you won't be able to get any for awhile.
Barring an event that makes your AO uninhabitable, your own home is still the best place to "ride it out".
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Scott Tschirhart
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Scott Tschirhart »

Blaine wrote:
Sat Sep 17, 2022 2:54 pm
jeepnik wrote:
Sat Sep 17, 2022 12:35 pm
The mention of get home bags has me mentioning that I had one in my my vehicles long before it became fashionable. Spending most of my work day some distance from home caused me to prepare fairly substantial bags (large duffle). I frequently spent days when I wasn't within a tankful of gas distance home.
Another good reason why I rarely let the tank on my truck get below 1/2. :idea: You never know when you won't be able to get any for awhile.
Barring an event that makes your AO uninhabitable, your own home is still the best place to "ride it out".
This is really good advice. I carry a number of things in my truck and I should carry more.

Guns are interesting.

You need to own the length of your vehicle, meaning you can hit whatever you want to at that distance. But if you have to abandon your vehicle and try to get somewhere on foot, it may be a good idea to spend some time on figuring out what you can do with your concealable handgun at longer distances.

I carry on my person all the time, but I also carry a .44 Magnum revolver in the truck because I know what I can do with it at extended distances with it. Would I do better with a carbine? Sure, but I have not figured out how to secure a carbine in the truck yet and it might be inconvenient to walk around with a carbine under some circumstances, but I can holster the .44 Mag and fill my pockets full of ammo and I can move around without drawing a lot of attention.
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Streetstar
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

Scott Tschirhart wrote:
Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:36 am
Blaine wrote:
Sat Sep 17, 2022 2:54 pm
jeepnik wrote:
Sat Sep 17, 2022 12:35 pm
The mention of get home bags has me mentioning that I had one in my my vehicles long before it became fashionable. Spending most of my work day some distance from home caused me to prepare fairly substantial bags (large duffle). I frequently spent days when I wasn't within a tankful of gas distance home.
Another good reason why I rarely let the tank on my truck get below 1/2. :idea: You never know when you won't be able to get any for awhile.
Barring an event that makes your AO uninhabitable, your own home is still the best place to "ride it out".
This is really good advice. I carry a number of things in my truck and I should carry more.

Guns are interesting.

You need to own the length of your vehicle, meaning you can hit whatever you want to at that distance. But if you have to abandon your vehicle and try to get somewhere on foot, it may be a good idea to spend some time on figuring out what you can do with your concealable handgun at longer distances.

I carry on my person all the time, but I also carry a .44 Magnum revolver in the truck because I know what I can do with it at extended distances with it. Would I do better with a carbine? Sure, but I have not figured out how to secure a carbine in the truck yet and it might be inconvenient to walk around with a carbine under some circumstances, but I can holster the .44 Mag and fill my pockets full of ammo and I can move around without drawing a lot of attention.


I understand carrying some bigger iron static in the truck. Kind of the role my recently aquired Glock 20 takes up. I've verified good accuracy at 50 yards (minute of pumpkin ? ) -- I keep it in an "inconspicuous" padded child's lunch container along with 3 magazines

The lunch container is something i can innocuously carry into my office during the day without announcing -- "There's guns in there !! " (Not that anybody much cares at my office - i'm lucky in that regard) -----

Pics below are of said lunch container and a sample of what i used to carry in there , however, as noted, i have since replaced the .380 with the 10. Is adequate for carrying wallet, (A money clip with a few bills, DL and a debit card is on person all the time, but the wallet has everything else ) spare cell phone, spare readers, and a paperback in case i ever get bored. Kind of an everyday small grab n go bag

Image

Image
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by 2ndovc »

I always though of them as Get Home Bags as well.

Spent some time yesterday reorganizing and repacking some of my stuff. With the new job I'll have a much smaller territory, so I'll be leaving the Mossberg Shockwave and a couple small totes with ammo and supplies in my F-150. Two smaller bags will go into the Chevy Equinox, company SUV. I still need to rebuild my first aid kit, but I have fire starters, water purifier ( life straw) medications to last a couple weeks. Compass, good boots and a couple extra pair of socks. The other has spare mags for my Sig 365, S&W M&P 0mm, magazines, holster and nylon pistol belt. Territory is going from what would take me a month to walk home from the outer edges to a day, maybe two.
I always have bottled water in the truck too. If I can't carry it, I'll leave it out for some who may need it.

Someone in a similar thread, that I wish I could give credit to said; " Go low, go slow and go in the dark". Makes a lot of sense to me.

jb 8)
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by AJMD429 »

.
Starting from my college days when I had automobiles that weren't necessarily very reliable, I've always had the philosophy that I should have appropriate clothing and whatever else I might need in order to walk home from wherever I am. When you have a 30 mile or so commute, you can probably walk home in a day as long as you got decent shoes and clothing. In that case all you're going to need is some water and snacks and a handgun with a bunch of extra ammo in case it really gets bad. Maybe a carbine if it gets really really bad.

Toilet paper, paper towels, Ziploc bags, duct tape, a change of clothes including extra socks and boots, trash bags, and basic first aid supplies are always kind of good to have in your car. A spare pair of glasses, and any vital prescription medications if needed.

On the other hand if you're talking 50 miles or more you may well be talking about overnighting someplace, which means you're probably going to have to have some sort of shoulder and at least an emergency thermal sleeping bag depending on the weather, plus more food and more water.

If radios were like the old days, and less dependent on repeaters and infrastructure, they would make sense for communication, but unless you have a team of people all prepared to go on the same frequency with the same codes at the same time, an ordinary citizens band radio is probably as useful as anything, even if it's just to listen to what others are talking about as far as weather or disasters or whatever is going on. Unfortunately that's going to require a power supply that may not be very lightweight.

And what if you're on vacation or work a 'travel' job, and it's a thousand miles or so to get home? Then it could get really interesting to say the least...

It would sure be nice if the administration had encouraged the honest citizens to have night vision goggles instead of giving them all to the terrorists, because that's something that I think a person might want if stranded in unfamiliar territory during a social collapse.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by wvfarrier »

My wife and I keep "get home" bags in our cars for everyday life. There are enough food (meal bars), medical supplies, fire starter, waterproof poncho and a Life straw to last 3 days. For longer travel we have REAL bug out bags which contain substantially more gear.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Paul105 »

as Marlinman and Pitchy mentioned above -- To old to run and no where to go anyway. If the grid goes down in the winter in the northern states, you are probably best to "hunker" down and will be lucky to survive starvation and exposure. Worst case scenario - Yellowstone super volcano blows - no place to hide.

Major city dwellers are probably in deep gradoo - traffic and fuel unavailability are major constraints - no place to go and no way to get there is there was.

Glass half empty guy here.

FWIW,

Paul
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by jeepnik »

As to what's in the bag. A change of suitable clothes and several additional pairs of sox (hey if you got to walk clean clothes aren't necessary, but clean sox are. Top quality boots (my work boots are good for working, but I'll be darned is I'm going to walk for days in steel toed boots). Good jacket, thermals, gloves, knit cap and lightweight rain gear. MRE's for a week and a good supply of water plus a Katadyn filter, hey I am a water guru. The necessary stuff for cooking and eating. Small one man pack tent and a sleeping bag & pad (think backpacking stuff). A very complete med kit (remember I was a paramedic once). handheld GPS, three compasses, and topos of the area's I visit. Solar powered & handcranked weather radio/light (can also charge phone). Road flares, other fire starting stuff. A good fixed blade knife, I will already have a good multitool, folding saw, paracord, light sticks and other stuff I can't think of off the top of my head. It's all in a duffle with shoulder straps.

As to firearms, it will be my current EDC and either my Jeep gun or a 20 ga Franchi 48L modified in the same manner.

But the most important thing I will have isn't in the bag or on the truck. It's a tiny bit of knowledge that I learned from the oldest 24 year old I ever met. "Go low, go slow, and preferrably in the dark". It's more important to get there than how fast you get there. And if you don't meet anyone along the way you haven't seen first you done good.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by OldWin »

I've worked 50 miles from home on nights for 34 years. Pretty empty roads in between. I keep plenty of stuff in my vehicles and have a 3 day pack with enough to walk home over a few days. I keep at least a pistol, and sometimes a 94 carbine in the truck. My pack has a change of clothes, several ways to make fire, a fixed blade knife, Leatherman, 100ft. of 550 cord, a twig stove and "supercat" alcohol stove, a couple Mountain House meals, a Sawyer Mini water filter, and a bunch of other stuff.
Total weight is around 12lbs.

As for "bugging out"....
I always subscribed to the theory that it isn't how much you have, but how little you can get by with. Mobility is king. Above all else. Having a "plan" or a location to go to can be a trap if you're not willing to abandon it.

"Bugging In" is viable in the short term, or in a localized situation. In fact, it's probably best. However, if the situation stretches out or is widespread, your big pile of stuff will get you killed.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Scott Tschirhart »

OldWin wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 5:51 am
"Bugging In" is viable in the short term, or in a localized situation. In fact, it's probably best. However, if the situation stretches out or is widespread, your big pile of stuff will get you killed.
You have a good point there. Remeber if folks know you are sitting on a stash of what they want, you become a target.

Living humbly is always a good idea.
Last edited by Scott Tschirhart on Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Grizz
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Grizz »

OldWin,

I agree with all of this. I know someone who has numerous guns and knives he wants to put in his bug out bag. He can barely walk to a grocery store and carry back a small sack of enough food to last a day and a half. Much as i try i can't get him to stash beans and rice in his apt. The ONLY way i know to get any quantity of stuff transported is by water. a canoe in the great lakes, properly loaded, can transport someone thousands of miles, like down river to the sea. 78% of the planet is covered in water.
.
https://www.paddletotheamazon.com/
.
https://www.amazon.com/Thousand-Miles-R ... 1929516061
.
Title: Voyage of the Paper Canoe
A Geographical Journey of 2500 miles, from Quebec to the
Gulf of Mexico, during the years 1874-5.
.
there are many others, but it's a fact that a voyaging canoe can support one or two people indefinitely. they can travel in inches of water, and don't need gasoline or any fuels but for a stove when away from land.
.
and the best idea? connect two decked canoes into a catamaran and you can literally circle the globe.
.
In 1991-97 Rory McDougall sailed his self-built Tiki 21 'Cooking Fat' around the world, sometimes alone, sometimes with a companion. She was, and still is, the smallest catamaran to have circumnavigated. In 2010 Rory entered 'Cooking Fat' in the Jester Challenge (single handed 'race' across the Atlantic for small boats - under 30ft) and came into Newport, Rhode Island a close second after 34 days.
.
two 21 foot freight canoes set up the same way can do the same thing.
.
way mo'better than being stuck in a mud puddle, out of gas, and full of stuff you can't move . . .
.
IMO
.
BUT based on actual reality
.
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OldWin
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by OldWin »

Scott Tschirhart wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:03 am
OldWin wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 5:51 am
"Bugging In" is viable in the short term, or in a localized situation. In fact, it's probably best. However, if the situation stretches out or is widespread, your big pile of stuff will get you killed.
You have a good point there. Remmeber if folks know you are sitting on a stash of what they want, you become a target.

Living humbly is always a good idea.
Yes. People will band together just long enough to conquer your defenses and get what you have. They will convince themselves it is the answer to all their problems. As soon as they accomplish this, they will start to kill each other for it, but it won't matter to you.
If you look around, this is how our society operates now, just with less obvious violence.
George Patton said it best...."Forts are a monument to man's stupidity".
Grizz wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:28 am
OldWin,

I agree with all of this. I know someone who has numerous guns and knives he wants to put in his bug out bag. He can barely walk to a grocery store and carry back a small sack of enough food to last a day and a half. Much as i try i can't get him to stash beans and rice in his apt. The ONLY way i know to get any quantity of stuff transported is by water. a canoe in the great lakes, properly loaded, can transport someone thousands of miles, like down river to the sea. 78% of the planet is covered in water.
.
https://www.paddletotheamazon.com/
.
https://www.amazon.com/Thousand-Miles-R ... 1929516061
.
Title: Voyage of the Paper Canoe
A Geographical Journey of 2500 miles, from Quebec to the
Gulf of Mexico, during the years 1874-5.
.
there are many others, but it's a fact that a voyaging canoe can support one or two people indefinitely. they can travel in inches of water, and don't need gasoline or any fuels but for a stove when away from land.
.
and the best idea? connect two decked canoes into a catamaran and you can literally circle the globe.
.
In 1991-97 Rory McDougall sailed his self-built Tiki 21 'Cooking Fat' around the world, sometimes alone, sometimes with a companion. She was, and still is, the smallest catamaran to have circumnavigated. In 2010 Rory entered 'Cooking Fat' in the Jester Challenge (single handed 'race' across the Atlantic for small boats - under 30ft) and came into Newport, Rhode Island a close second after 34 days.
.
two 21 foot freight canoes set up the same way can do the same thing.
.
way mo'better than being stuck in a mud puddle, out of gas, and full of stuff you can't move . . .
.
IMO
.
BUT based on actual reality
.
Haha hey Grizz. I know you are one of the people who is squared away. I have no doubt in your ability to survive. :D
I have 3 canoes of various lengths and construction. A 14, a 16, and a 20. ABS, aluminum, and wood. Maine is a canoe paradise. Huge amounts of Ponds, rivers, and navigable streams. Very low profile. The other useful vehicle is snowshoes and bicycles.
Be nice.....it's more important than truth.
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Streetstar
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

AJMD429 wrote:
Mon Sep 19, 2022 8:27 pm
.

Toilet paper, paper towels, Ziploc bags, duct tape, a change of clothes including extra socks and boots, trash bags, and basic first aid supplies are always kind of good to have in your car. A spare pair of glasses, and any vital prescription medications if needed.
Thanks Doc, i've got some of this covered but the duct tape and spare meds are great idea - i'm on a mild dose of Lisinopril for BP and have a surplus of it, so i can keep a bottle in the bag easily
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Streetstar
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

jeepnik wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 1:59 am
As to what's in the bag. A change of suitable clothes and several additional pairs of sox (hey if you got to walk clean clothes aren't necessary, but clean sox are. Top quality boots (my work boots are good for working, but I'll be darned is I'm going to walk for days in steel toed boots). Good jacket, thermals, gloves, knit cap and lightweight rain gear. MRE's for a week and a good supply of water plus a Katadyn filter, hey I am a water guru. The necessary stuff for cooking and eating. Small one man pack tent and a sleeping bag & pad (think backpacking stuff). A very complete med kit (remember I was a paramedic once). handheld GPS, three compasses, and topos of the area's I visit. Solar powered & handcranked weather radio/light (can also charge phone). Road flares, other fire starting stuff. A good fixed blade knife, I will already have a good multitool, folding saw, paracord, light sticks and other stuff I can't think of off the top of my head. It's all in a duffle with shoulder straps.

Thx Jeepnik ! - very comprehensive !
----- Doug
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Streetstar
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

OldWin wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 5:51 am
I've worked 50 miles from home on nights for 34 years. Pretty empty roads in between. I keep plenty of stuff in my vehicles and have a 3 day pack with enough to walk home over a few days. I keep at least a pistol, and sometimes a 94 carbine in the truck. My pack has a change of clothes, several ways to make fire, a fixed blade knife, Leatherman, 100ft. of 550 cord, a twig stove and "supercat" alcohol stove, a couple Mountain House meals, a Sawyer Mini water filter, and a bunch of other stuff.
Total weight is around 12lbs.

Thanks - your pack seems like a little more streamlined affair than Jeepnik's , but with a lot of similarities

I've pondered the need for a long gun , because as a general rule, i'm not expecting violence - but i guess most people don't . I do have one of the compact Mossberg Shockwaves though - its a mildly irritating little beast to shoot, but i have contemplated jumping through the hoops to have it registered as an AOW so i can put a shoulder stock on it (but then , it would likely be the same length or longer than one of the AR pistol variants with a "brace" )
----- Doug
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Streetstar »

Folks , thanks for all your great responses - and Grizz, your speaking of canoes reminds me of how wild and expansive place you live in ! Very cool and makes me ponder the fact that i could potentially squeeze some real utility out of my 2 recreational kayaks i have in storage :) - if i daisy chained both of them together i could certainly carry a lot of gear

I've been pondering this as i've had 2 events that i really could've used some more supplies with

1) motor home fire in 2008 that destroyed almost everything and left me outside in flip flops and gym shorts. I had a tow-behind vehicle but it wasnt stocked with anything and i left the keys in the motor home when i evacuated. So - no money, no wallet, no cellphone, no car keys for the S-10 - as luck would have it, i am an avid cyclist, so the mountain bike i had disassembled and stashed in a rear storage compartment was not affected so i was able to ride out and make a few phone calls

2) i sank my truck in a boat ramp accident a few years back on a kayaking expedition with the fiance'. - was able to retain things like wallet and credit cards - one of the cellphones still continued to work after being drowned also (newer Apple 7 or 8 series ) - Naturally everything else was soaked too , including clothes. We hitched a ride to a nearby lodge but they had no public laundry to dry our clothes but gave me a discount on a room for the night -- so given the company i was with, having to operate sans clothes while everything drip dried off the balcony seemed to work out alright ------- small rural area with no rental car facilities, but they had a gas station that had U-Haul's
The owner of the station's son picked me up at the lodge the next AM and drove me back to rent a U-haul and i loaded up our kayaks and wet belongings and drove us home

Sounds pretty good right? Had money and a working credit card and cell phone, so is an adventure i should be able to laugh about to this day ! Oh - except my lady was in the truck when it rolled back and was submerged and still claims to have PTSD about it to this day - and still thinks im an idot for leaving the truck in gear and hopping out , but thats another story

------
Scenario 1 - a spare set of keys and a bag of supplies in my little S-10 truck (to include enough cash for gas money to get home ) sure would have made that situation a lot more comfortable -- i was 500 or so miles away from home

Scenario 2 -- A dry bag for the clothes and water sensitive essentials anytime you are going to be around water seems like a good idea. And in this scenario, we were in a popular recreational area, albeit in the off season -- so getting a ride to town wasnt a big deal, --- but if we were more rural, things could have gotten pretty primitive - especially with nothing dry
----- Doug
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OldWin
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by OldWin »

Reminds me.....a few other things worth mentioning. I have a couple small candles in there too. They serve a few purposes. First, it makes it easier to light a fire off a lit candle. It provides light while you work in an improvised campsite, and if you sit on the ground with a raincoat or tarp o er you, it will heat up the inside enough to keep you very warm.
I also keep a small stainless Stanley cookset from Walmart.
A small compass and a small LED flashlight with spare batteries.
Goes without saying, some first aid supplies.
Be nice.....it's more important than truth.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Grizz »

i keep candles in my car stuff too. i keep an ignition key in a frame void that i can reach by sliding under the rig. has come in handy several times. i don't use clickers in my vehicles, just the keys. both the chevy and toyota are one key rigs. in the trunk, which is a cargo box i built for my cooking gear and tools, i keep a container of petroleum jelly for ad hock fire starter and water proofer. I melt parafin into the match boxes. I carry a kelly kettle that fits in the trunk. it will boil 20 oz of water in 7 to 10 minutes with found sticks or pallets or an alcohol burner. or the gimbaled propane boat stove that i carry in the trunk. good for the freeze dried stuff and high octane coffee. and tea. and soups. and for thawing snow so i don't get hypothermia. in summer trips i carry 6 gallons of water in a blue container with a spigot. sounds like a lot of weight, but it's still lighter than a couple of passengers. too much to carry. maybe I should put a canoe on the roof? IDK. sorry to hear about the RV fire. that reminds me I keep a fire extinguisher in the passenger foot well. oh yeah, scissors. seems odd ball until i need something i forgot.
GN
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Grizz »

and Grizz, your speaking of canoes reminds me of how wild and expansive place you live in ! Very cool and makes me ponder the fact that i could potentially squeeze some real utility out of my 2 recreational kayaks i have in storage :) - if i daisy chained both of them together i could certainly carry a lot of gear
for the record, i live on an edge of puget sound now, but raised my kids in Alaska, and everything i learned in Alaska, well two things maybe, apply in puget sound too.

don't know if you follow R2AK, an annual race from Port Townsend by boat with the only rule being no engine and no support. . . . one guy made the trip on a paddle board and averaged 60 miles per day. that's a lot faster than trying to walk there thru the wilderness.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by 2ndovc »

Grizz wrote:
Wed Sep 21, 2022 1:08 am
and Grizz, your speaking of canoes reminds me of how wild and expansive place you live in ! Very cool and makes me ponder the fact that i could potentially squeeze some real utility out of my 2 recreational kayaks i have in storage :) - if i daisy chained both of them together i could certainly carry a lot of gear
for the record, i live on an edge of puget sound now, but raised my kids in Alaska, and everything i learned in Alaska, well two things maybe, apply in puget sound too.

don't know if you follow R2AK, an annual race from Port Townsend by boat with the only rule being no engine and no support. . . . one guy made the trip on a paddle board and averaged 60 miles per day. that's a lot faster than trying to walk there thru the wilderness.


Grizz,
Thanks for the R2AK plug, I'd never heard of it, but now I really wish I was about 25 again! :D

I've mentioned this thought before, if I'm closer to Lake Erie or a tributary, I'll home far faster than walking. I can get a "borrowed" boat to less than a mile from home.

jb 8)
jasonB " Another Dirty Yankee"


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Grizz
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by Grizz »

2ndovc wrote:
Wed Sep 21, 2022 5:12 am
Grizz wrote:
Wed Sep 21, 2022 1:08 am
and Grizz, your speaking of canoes reminds me of how wild and expansive place you live in ! Very cool and makes me ponder the fact that i could potentially squeeze some real utility out of my 2 recreational kayaks i have in storage :) - if i daisy chained both of them together i could certainly carry a lot of gear
for the record, i live on an edge of puget sound now, but raised my kids in Alaska, and everything i learned in Alaska, well two things maybe, apply in puget sound too.

don't know if you follow R2AK, an annual race from Port Townsend by boat with the only rule being no engine and no support. . . . one guy made the trip on a paddle board and averaged 60 miles per day. that's a lot faster than trying to walk there thru the wilderness.


Grizz,
Thanks for the R2AK plug, I'd never heard of it, but now I really wish I was about 25 again! :D

I've mentioned this thought before, if I'm closer to Lake Erie or a tributary, I'll home far faster than walking. I can get a "borrowed" boat to less than a mile from home.

jb 8)


Thanks for the feed back!
I've mentioned this before, when the "BIG ONE" hits, when the cascadia subduction zone subducts, there will be LOTS of free boats around. https://disasterpreparedness.org/disast ... northwest/

I try to keep tools around that enable me to make a stone age catamaran out of two giant spruce trees. And a borrowed boat is a viable solution to some problems. I've been partial to kayaks, made meat out of one I built for the move to alaska, but open canoes have made major voyages, and they're not hard to deck. There was a guy in alaska who proved the concept and built a decked cruising canoe. Blazing fast, sipped fuel, total environmental control, easy to move over ice and sea weed, and nearly invisible along the shore line. I felt sorry for him. While struggling to feed and clothe my navy tug conversion and my family. My op expenses would fund the other guy's expenses for Years! Wish I could remember his name. Go well.
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Re: Bug Out Bags

Post by mickbr »

In military equivalents if it helps a decision, you have your patrol or fighting wear, usually what keeps in you in the field for 24 hours. Webbing/chest rig, or a 20-30litre/600CU day pack, all the odds and ends( small first aid kit, a days food, ammo, weapon, Nav/maps, maybe shelter, comms/phone, knife, multitool , poncho, spare clothes optional) etc. This may equate to a short term bug out bag or get home bag. its light effective, easily mobilised.

Next level is your main pack, or 'house on your back'. This adds more water,the big 4( the pack itself, sleeping bag, shelter and sleeping mat) any missions specific kit, more protective clothing types( helmet, cold weather, etc)and 3-14 days more food. Its worn with the kit above included or inside it. Its around 80-120litres, 6000Cui or so. Your base weight ( meaning less food/water) you should try to keep to 20lbs-25lbs or so. Every 2lbs over is a day less food you can carry. A soldier will march or harbor with everythingand ideally fight or patrol just in the lighter rig.

(There are also 48-72 hour pack setups)

Then vehicle mounted stores, whatever you can load a car, truck, boat or plane with. The levels for this are Im either 'coming back one day' or INCH( Im never coming home). The latter means you are beverely hillbillies style if need be.

Then depot or bases, which in this case is your home( if your staying put), or any planned get away locations and stores caches en route to it.

The idea is you combine options depending what is happening. Eg put 24hr fighting gear(bug out bag) and main pack in the vehicle, then pack out on foot if the car cant go any further.

Also worth noting the utility of hand drawn carts and bicycles. They can double or triple your stores carriage, helpful for carrying the load for kids too. The viet-cong ran supply lines in the jungle pushing up to 200lb loads on bicycles with one pedal cut off.
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